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Stars Making a Social Impact: Why & How Actress Ashley Tisdale of ‘Frenshe’ Is Helping To Change…

Stars Making a Social Impact: Why & How Actress Ashley Tisdale of ‘Frenshe’ Is Helping To Change Our World

I think that it’s important, as moms, to share these stories. Because often people have this guilt factor of trying to keep breastfeeding if it’s still not working, but just feeling like everybody has an opinion and what are people going to think? I think it’s important to be really present with your baby. As new moms, we have a lot of pressure already just trying to learn everything. Don’t put too much pressure on yourself when something’s not working, because there are great options out there. So, with my success, I just love to spread awareness, be vulnerable and share stories, but also just help people feel less alone.

As a part of our series about stars who are making an important social impact, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Ashley Tisdale.

Ashley Tisdale is an actress, singer, founder of wellness blog, Frenshe, and new mom. Often known for her movie and tv roles, Ashley is also passionate about health and wellness — helping empower others to be the happiest, healthiest versions of themselves. As a new mom, she is learning how to decide what’s best for her baby and found that, when it comes to formula, Enfamil Enspire was the best choice for her and her daughter, Jupiter.

Thank you so much for joining us on this interview series. Can you share with us the backstory that led you to this career path?

I honestly was very lucky that I fell into this career at a very young age. I started when I was three years old in commercials and modeling and it’s something I always enjoyed. My parents felt that I learned a lot being on set and they felt that it was really naturally how it happened. They were like, ‘I guess this is her calling,’ and always gave me the option to have a normal life. They really pushed me into going to regular school and having an actual job at the mall when I was 16. They really were parents that, even though I had kind of been working since I was three and loved what I did, wanted to show other options and that you can do whatever you want to do. I just have always loved acting and being a part of this business.

Can you share the funniest or most interesting story that occurred to you in the course of your career? What was the lesson or takeaway you took out of that story?

When I was eight years old, I remember seeing my friend in Les Misérables on Broadway and turning to my mom saying, “That’s what I want to do.” And so, I had talked to my manager and told him I wanted to audition for Les Misérables. And he was like, “Well, have you ever sung before?” And I was like, ‘No.’” And he was just like, “Well, it’s a Broadway musical, you need to sing.” I was like, “Get me the audition and I will work my butt off on learning the songs.” And that just really who I am as a person, is that when I see something I want, I go for it and I’m very driven and I’ll do everything and anything to do it.

The best part is that I’m pretty fearless in those things as well. Because when I was eight, I had no idea what I was getting myself into. I actually got hired. I booked the national tour of Les Misérables.

I remember saying to my mom, “So do I l listen to headphones on stage and sing with it?” And she was like “Oh God, I hope she knows what she just got herself into.” I’m fearless in that way where I just like jump into something. I don’t always know what that is, but I’m going to figure it out and work really hard and I’m pretty driven.

As for the lesson or takeaway — be fearless, jump in and give it your best.

What would you advise a young person who wants to emulate your success?

I think it’s important to never look at someone and say you want to emulate that success. I think that we all have such different journeys and it’s important to be on your own journey. That said, if you want to be an actor or a singer, I’ve always been someone who just works really hard and doesn’t give up. If that’s something you really want to do, know that it comes with a lot of hard work. It’s also important to know that because you can do anything. I honestly do believe [that]. Like if you want to be an actress, take as many acting classes as you can.

When I was younger and just like, growing and learning, like obviously I was acting while I was in school and then in high school and stuff, but I was still taking so many different classes and so many different methods acting and anything that I could really learn from. I always feel like you just get stronger, and you get better. It’s like dance. I was not the best dancer when I was younger, but doing movies where it had dance in it or playing a cheerleader in Hellcats, you just get better at doing those things. I think in this day and age we see social media and we think, ‘oh, I can attain that and do it fast’. I would argue that if you want to be really good at it, you have to definitely take the time to do the classes.

Is there a person that made a profound impact on your life? Can you share a story?

I would say that would be my grandfather, my pop-pop Arnold, on my mom’s side. I think he really did have an impact on my life because I was really shy as a kid. I was really quiet. I’m still pretty shy when I meet people. But when I was younger, I would audition for movies and TV shows. And whenever it came down to like the callback or like the last call back, I just didn’t really know how to have that confidence and win over the job. My grandfather was a pitchman. He actually is still on TV today at late at night if you’ve watched the infomercials. As a pitchman, his whole job entails obviously selling the product and being confident in himself.

He really did teach me how to own the room — come in, be confident and know your worth. I think that that’s something that I’ve carried through meetings, not just acting, but just in everyday life with me being creative and doing work with brands. That is something that has really guided me throughout my life.

How are you using your success to bring goodness to the world? Can you share with us the meaningful or exciting causes you’re working on right now?

A year ago, I launched my website, Frenshe.com, and it really is about my journey through mental health and nontoxic living and the balance of that. I have such a huge platform and audience and so I really wanted to share my journey in mental health because I know that a lot of people suffer from anxiety and depression. I felt like there was a need to be vulnerable and to speak about my experiences and to make people feel less alone at home.

I think I’ve carried that through becoming a mom. There are obviously things that don’t always work out. And for me, breastfeeding was one of them. I did not have the best experience and it wasn’t really working for Jupiter. But knowing that I had other options like Enfamil gave me peace of mind. Jupiter has been on Enfamil’s Enspire formula for six months now and she is just thriving. Enspire is Enfamil’s closest formula to breast milk. It made me feel so great knowing that she’s getting her key nutrients.

Can you share with us a story behind why you chose to take up this particular cause?

I think that it’s important, as moms, to share these stories. Because often people have this guilt factor of trying to keep breastfeeding if it’s still not working, but just feeling like everybody has an opinion and what are people going to think? I think it’s important to be really present with your baby. As new moms, we have a lot of pressure already just trying to learn everything. Don’t put too much pressure on yourself when something’s not working, because there are great options out there. So, with my success, I just love to spread awareness, be vulnerable and share stories, but also just help people feel less alone.

Can you share with us a story about a person who was impacted by your cause?

I definitely have had a lot of followers direct message me on Instagram thanking me for sharing my journey because they were going through the same thing, and it made them feel less alone. Just that knowing that I have gone through this, they felt less guilty about the breastfeeding not working out. So, I definitely feel like that has helped a lot of people. Even on my mental health journey, I get so many direct messages from people on social media, but also text messages from friends who are going through things, and I would never have even thought they were going through those things. Just goes to show how important being authentic is. The more we share our stories, the more it creates this kind of community that feels more open and a safe space for people. And like I said, then they feel like they’re less alone in it.

Are there three things or are there things that individuals, society, or the government can do to support you in this effort?

I think just providing more support as new moms and with society just less hate and criticism. I feel like social media is this platform where everyone has their own opinion, but then wants to share their opinion, and can be sometimes critical over things. I think that we should be more supportive of each other, especially as new moms because we’re going through something that’s very different, and we should kind of have more kindness and love for others than to be more critical.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started”

  1. Be present: There are so many times where I wish I had been more at the moment when I was younger, like performing for 80k people in South America with the High School Musical tour. Looking back, I wish I took a moment to take it all in.
  2. Know your worth: It’s taken me a while to realize this one. It’s also because I’m quick to just want to work, I love it so much. But it’s important for you to realize this because fewer people will take advantage of you.
  3. It might take a bit longer than expected but you’ll get there: I started when I was three and didn’t become successful until I was 20. That’s a long time, people always want to make it sound like you’re an overnight success but most of the time that’s pretty far from the truth.
  4. No is a complete sentence: you don’t have to make excuses for why you don’t want to do that movie or role. No is enough.
  5. Love yourself: There are times where I was really hard on myself in the past and wish I had given myself a break. We all make mistakes and that’s ok. The most important thing is you forgive yourself and start treating you like you would treat your best friend. Have more compassion for yourself.

You’re a person of enormous influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger.

Something that I do on social media is I share my stories, my most vulnerable stories that are really raw feel like if we could do more of that, that would just bring so much more good to social media. We’re so used to seeing things that I think make people feel bad and they might not feel great being on social media as much. I feel like if we can be more vulnerable and more authentic and real, I think that that would create such a huge movement. I haven’t really seen a lot of that on social media.

Can you please give us your favorite life lesson quote? And can you explain how that was relevant in your life?

“What matters most is not reward, praise, or pride. What matters most is at the end of the day you tried.”

My mom gave that to me. It was like in a card, I think. I really liked it because it’s not about the outcome. What’s most important is that you did something. So many times, we are looking at the outcome like, well what is this going to do for me, but you know what, it’s really not about that. It’s about what you brought to the table and the fact that you did something, and you created an idea, or you did that role. The most important thing is how you feel about it versus what other people think.

We’re blessed that some of the biggest names in business, VC funding, politics, sports, and entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world or in the us who you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with and why? He or she might see this if we tag them

I’m really inspired by interior design, and I think Kelly Wearstler, who’s an interior designer, is amazing at what she does. I would just love to sit down with her and pick her brain!

Thank you so much for these amazing insights. This was so inspiring, and we wish you continued success!


Stars Making a Social Impact: Why & How Actress Ashley Tisdale of ‘Frenshe’ Is Helping To Change… was originally published in Authority Magazine on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.